Real time Electronics

SLM, SLE, VTS

Created for major problems

Devices are using RFID,GPRS, GPS
& Environmental parameters

M2M and IoT solutions

Machine-to-Machine & Internet of Things that remotely track, monitor, and control fixed
and mobile assets

Our Development

To try the most advanced business

Soil Sensor
Giving instantaneous information on soil moisture content,salinity, temperature, and more, soil sensors are an important tool for anyone involved with soil, from a small-town farmer trying to increase his crop yield to researchers looking at how soil retains and off gases CO2. More importantly, just as computers have increased in power and dropped in price due to economies of scale, advanced soil measurement systems can be found at prices that are affordable for everyone.


ARM Development Board  
We make general purpose Evaluation board based on ARM7 micro controllers. This is very useful as a quick development aid- for example, if you plan to make a micro controller based product, it can be very convenient to buy and use.


FPGA Development Board  
A board that uses a SPARTAN-3 FPGA series device
Interfacing to real world devices
Implementation of communication protocols
Developing our own application out of onboard component.


51 Development Board
 This 8051 development board provides easy to use development platform useful to play with the hardware devices like LCD, Keyboard, Stepper Motor, RTC, ADC, RTC, Serial Communication. It also provides ISP programming facility.


RFID Access Control  RFID Access control & payroll System is developed to use in organizations for the purpose of maintaining security as well as Access information of all the employees. This product makes use of RFID Card Reader in synchronization with the access control software. This RFID Card Reader device will be implemented at a particular Entry/Exit point in the organization for the security purpose. Every employee will be given a personal RFID Card when he/she joins the organization.


PIC Development Board
PIC Development Board is proposed to smooth the progress of developing and debugging of various designs encompassing Microcontrollers from Microchip. It’s designed as to facilitate (16F/18F 40PIN DIP) On-board Programmer for PIC Microcontroller through ISP on Universal Serial port. It integrates on board USART, LEDs, keypads, 3 ADC inputs and LCD Display to create a stand-alone versatile test platform. User can easily engage in development in this platform, or use it as reference to application development.


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Electronics Manufacturing Services Activity


Facilities & Capabilities

Production support to customers to cater smaller volumes to larger volumes with same zeal. Working partnership with our customers for product development. Close interaction with our customers and suppliers.

Equipments

1)  SMD Reflow Oven, Model RF-300, 3 zone, conveyorised, table-top with std.
2)  SMD Stencil Printer ,Model SPR 500
3)  Manual printer with X,Y,Z and Theta adjustment.
4)  Wave soldering machine model DWSM 300LF, Lead Free, SMD wave, Auto flux,solder wave on-off, table-top m/c.
5)  Ultrasonic cleaning machine tank- 12"x7"x8",250 watt,Temp ,timer, pcb basket.
6)  Dispenser for spot dispensing with foot switch and 200 cc adopter.
7)  Soldering Iron.
8)  Magnifying Lense

Test & Measuring Equipment

1)  Digital Storage Oscilloscope 200MHz
2)  Digital Multimeters
3)  Power Supply
4)  DC Source
5)  LCR Bridge
6)  AC Voltage.





Group Companies

and let's see what are they saying

Qualität Systems is One of the Top 10 Most Promising Embedded Companies in India - Silicon India Magazine, Aug 2013

Chakradhar Borkute

CEO

Practical Technologies is a full-service electronics manufacturing services (EMS) company located in Baltimore, MD, with over 25 years of experience building products for communications, medical and various other industries, as well as the military.

Practical Technologies

Our Services

All Services

embedded System Services

VLSI Design

DSP Services

IT Services



Careers


Connect, Grow and
Bring your passion to work and accelerate your career at Einnovation


PHOTO GALLERY




Einnovation Technologies is a Customer Application Specific Product & Solutions company offering INNOVATIVE solutions, which ranges across Intellectual Property (IP) cores, Design & Development, Prototype Development, Next-Gen Digital products, Integrated solutions, Low Volume Manufacturing, System Upgrades and Obsolescence management, Semiconductor solutions. ETPL is a leading developer of advanced electronic system level products and solutions to three primary markets.ETPL is headquartered in Pune, India.The company has been consistently evolving by setting new benchmarks in the Quality Design Process. ETPL strongly believe in Customer Focus, Creativity, Competence and Commitment which helps in enabling excellence in the work quality.



Jane

Visual Studio


   1)     C# , MVC , ASP.net

   2)     Interns for duration of 6 months.

   3)     info@einnovation.in



Mike

Android Studio


   1)     Android Application developer

   2)     Interns for duration of 6 months.

   3)     info@einnovation.in



John

Python


   1)     Python Developer

   2)     Interns for duration of 6 months.

   3)     info@einnovation.in



Jane

Chakradhar Borkute

CEO & Founder

Believes in Creativity.

chakradhar.cc@gmail.com

Jane

Chakradhar Borkute

CEO & Founder

Believes in Creativity.

chakradhar.cc@gmail.com

Jane

Chakradhar Borkute

CEO & Founder

Believes in Creativity.

chakradhar.cc@gmail.com

News / Blogs

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On 21 October of last year, a variety of major websites—including those of Twitter, PayPal, Spotify, Netflix, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal—stopped working. The cause was a distributed denial-of-service attack, not on these websites themselves but on the provider they and many others used to support the Domain Name System, or DNS, which translates the name of the site into its numerical address on the Internet. The DNS provider in this case was a company called Dyn, whose servers were barraged by so many fake requests for DNS lookups that they couldn’t answer the real ones. Distributed denial-of-service attacks are common enough. But two things made this attack special. First, it hobbled a large DNS provider, so it disrupted many different websites. Also, the fake requests didn’t come from the usual botnet of compromised desktop and laptop computers. Rather, the attack was orchestrated through tens of millions of small, connected devices, things like Internet-connected cameras and home routers—components of what is often called the Internet of Things, or IoT for short. For several years now, the number of things connected to the Internet—including phones, smart watches, fitness trackers, home thermostats, and various sensors—has exceeded the human population. By 2020, there will be tens of billions of such gadgets online. The burgeoning size of the Internet of Things reflects the fastest economic growth ever experienced for any sector in the history of human civilization. For the most part, this development promises great excitement and opportunity for engineers and society at large. But there is a dark cloud hanging over the IoT: the concomitant threats to security and privacy, which will be of a scale never experienced before. Our digital systems are vulnerable to malicious hackers attempting to gain unauthorized access, steal personal data and other information, hold the information they steal for ransom, and even bring systems down completely, as happened with the attack on Dyn. The result is an ongoing arms race between hackers and computer-security experts, forcing the rest of us to live on a treadmill of security updates to the software we run on our various computers. Click Here to read more



On 21 October of last year, a variety of major websites—including those of Twitter, PayPal, Spotify, Netflix, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal—stopped working. The cause was a distributed denial-of-service attack, not on these websites themselves but on the provider they and many others used to support the Domain Name System, or DNS, which translates the name of the site into its numerical address on the Internet. The DNS provider in this case was a company called Dyn, whose servers were barraged by so many fake requests for DNS lookups that they couldn’t answer the real ones. Distributed denial-of-service attacks are common enough. But two things made this attack special. First, it hobbled a large DNS provider, so it disrupted many different websites. Also, the fake requests didn’t come from the usual botnet of compromised desktop and laptop computers. Rather, the attack was orchestrated through tens of millions of small, connected devices, things like Internet-connected cameras and home routers—components of what is often called the Internet of Things, or IoT for short. For several years now, the number of things connected to the Internet—including phones, smart watches, fitness trackers, home thermostats, and various sensors—has exceeded the human population. By 2020, there will be tens of billions of such gadgets online. The burgeoning size of the Internet of Things reflects the fastest economic growth ever experienced for any sector in the history of human civilization. For the most part, this development promises great excitement and opportunity for engineers and society at large. But there is a dark cloud hanging over the IoT: the concomitant threats to security and privacy, which will be of a scale never experienced before. Our digital systems are vulnerable to malicious hackers attempting to gain unauthorized access, steal personal data and other information, hold the information they steal for ransom, and even bring systems down completely, as happened with the attack on Dyn. The result is an ongoing arms race between hackers and computer-security experts, forcing the rest of us to live on a treadmill of security updates to the software we run on our various computers. Click Here to read more